Best Yiddish Words For Kids – Learning Drives

Best Yiddish Words For Kids – Learning Drives  .Yiddish words are a common part of everyday conversation if you were raised in a Jewish home. Even if you don’t belong to The Tribe, and don’t know how to distinguish your punims from your keppies, it’s not too late to learn some basic words and spice up your vocabulary. You can find the best Yiddish phrases and words, no matter if you are a boy or a girl.

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Oy Vey

Oy vey can be translated as “dismay” or “woe”. It is often abbreviated as “oy” or “oyvey iz mi.”

A Yiddisher Kop

Yiddishe Kop can also be translated to “a Jewish head” and used to describe a smart person. Example: “My husband is Yiddishe Kop!”

Balaboosta

Balaboosta, a term of affection that literally means “perfect homemaker,” is Einat Admony’s definition. Balaboosta, to her, means “someone who loves cooking and caring for their family.”

Nosh

Nosh can be translated as “to snack” or “to nibble.” The word is often used in informal English but comes from Yiddish “nashn”. It can also be used as a description of a light meal or any type of food. Let’s say, for example, “Let’s have a snack before we go.”

Kvetch

Kvetch, a Yiddish word for “to complain” and “to whine,” is what a mother might say to her children.

Schlep

Schlep means to drag or lug around something, often with difficulty. Example: “Oye, we moved to a wrong area of town.” It is so difficult to get to synagogue.

Mentch

In Yiddish, the meaning of Mensch was traditionally a person who is good. Mensch is now used to mean someone who is particularly good, a “stand-up guy”, or someone with high moral integrity.

Tachlis

Tachlis is when someone speaks straight to the point. “Tachlis, don’t sugarcoat it. Tell me what happened.”

Klutz

Klutz is a person who is very clumsy — someone who falls or drops things constantly.

Plotz

The verb plotz can be translated as to burst or shatter, crack, explode, or pop. It’s used in English to refer to someone who is literally bursting with emotion or intensity. It could be used to describe someone who is bursting with emotion or intensity, such as “I just finished running a marathon. I could just plotz (collapse).” But you could also be plotzing from laughter, or sharing big news.

Shmooze

To schmooze means to have a conversation or to make small talk, to get the vibe going. Sometimes, it is done to impress or network at certain events.

Yenta

Yenta, or Yente, is a name for a woman who is a gossiper or busybody. This name was originally given to daughters by their parents. It was believed to have been derived from the Italian term for gentle. However, it later acquired a new meaning. Yente was the name of the matchmaker in Fiddler on the Roof, and she was well-known for her meddling.

Shande

Yiddish defines a Shande as a scandal, embarrassment or something very shameful. You could shanda-ridden a gossip column. “Did he say that? “What a Shande!”

Schtick

A Schtick can be described as an entertainer’s routine, bit, or gimmick. It is a performance style that is associated with a particular person. However, it could also be their signature behavior, unique talent, or interest. “I know that I speak too loud, it is my schtick.”

Chutzpah

Chutzpah is a high level of self-confidence, courage, boldness, gall, or audacity. It took real Chutzpah to get her straight to the CEO and ask for a job.

Meshuggeneh

Meshuggeneh literally means crazy. Meshuggeneh is a term that denotes crazy, absurd or insane. He thinks he is able to speak to his mother like that. He is Meshuggeneh!” Another related word is mishegas, which can be translated as craziness.

Shmatte

A Schmatte can be described as a rag, or an old or worn-out clothing. You might hear your mom say, “You’re leaving the house in that Schmatte!”

Bubbe and Zeide

This is an essential Yiddish duo. Bubbe, Zeide are Grandmother and Grandfather. They are affectionate terms that can be used to-date.

You now know some words. Why not check these Yiddish curses that are outrageous?

This adorable video shows the Los Angeles Jewish Home’s elderly residents explaining the meanings of Yiddish terms.

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