Study Body Mapping Emotions – Learning Drives

Relax and reflect on the last time your heart was throbbing. Maybe you were walking along with your partner on the playground, looking into each other’s gazes as you were sipping a glass of Latte.

What was the location where you felt the tingle of love? Maybe there were butterflies in your stomach or your heart was racing from the excitement.

Researchers from Finland asked participants to pinpoint the places where that they felt emotions within their body. They found these results were similar across cultures.

The people who lived in joy said that love caused activity to be felt in every part of the body, while depression had the opposite result. It decreased the emotions of the legs, arms, and even the head. Anxiety and fear trigger intense chest pains, according to participants. Furthermore, anger was one of the emotions that caused the arms.

The researchers believe that body emoticons can eventually help psychologists in diagnosing and treating mood disorders.

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“Our emotional system in the brain sends signals to the body so we can deal with our situation,” says Lauri Nummenmaa a psychologist at Aalto University who led the study.

“Say you see a snake and you feel fear,” Nummenmaa says. “Your nervous system increases oxygen to your muscles and raises your heart rate so you can deal with the threat. It’s an automated system. We don’t have to think about it.”

The concept is in use for quite some time. Researchers aren’t quite sure if the changes in bodily function are different with each emotion and whether this pattern could be an aid to the mind is able to recognize emotions.

To discover what was the method, Nummenmaa and his team conducted a simple computer study involving 700 people from Finland, Sweden and Taiwan.

The participants were shown two silhouettes that were not finished of a person on the screen. Then, they asked participants to visualize one of 14 emotions, such as anger or hatred, anger, or disgust and pride. The participants then created areas of their bodies that were in a state which was triggered in response to the emotional. In the second photo, they traced areas of their body that were deactivated during the course of the emotion.

Everyone isn’t able to express each emotion in the same way. When the team averaged these maps, they found distinct pattern patterns discovered for every emotion. The team published the maps of sensation on Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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The team isn’t certain what the self-reported experiences are, and how they are related to physiological responses that accompany emotion.

But, prior studies have shown significant changes in the body’s sensations in people suffering from the symptoms of mood disorders, says Nummenmaa. “For instance, with depression sometimes people have pain in their chest.”

There’s also research suggesting that if you change your body language, such as your posture, posture, or stance you could alter the way you perceive you.

Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio who wasn’t part of the study, says is “delighted” by Nummenmaa’s findings as they provide further proof to his assertions for many years: Every emotion activates certain body parts, and he believes that the brain’s awareness of these patterns could assist us in recognizing the emotions in a way that is conscious.

“People look at emotions as something in relation to other people,” Damasio psychologist and associate professor at University of Southern California, says. “But emotions also have to do with how we deal with the environment — threats and opportunities.” Damasio suggests who are concerned about taking good care of your body and your mind.

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